Tuesday, April 25, 2017

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 25

It’s time for that final two-for-Tuesday prompt of April. Regulars probably already know what the prompt is.

Here are the two prompts for today:

  • Write a love poem. The poem could be about lovers, but also the love of family, love between friends, or even loving your job, chocolate, or music. Or…
  • Write an anti-love poem. Maybe you’re a hater; that’s fine. We’ve got the anti-love poem prompt for you.

*****

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_PoemsRe-create Your Poetry!

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at a Love and/or Anti-love Poem:

“deal or no deal”

i’ll fold all the laundry
& put it away too
if i can only get
one more sweet kiss from you

*****

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He folds laundry, washes dishes, and writes poems about getting kisses.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

*****

Find more poetic posts here:

The post 2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 25 appeared first on WritersDigest.com.


from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com
http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-april-pad-challenge-day-25

Monday, April 24, 2017

New Literary Agent Alert: Sarah Bedingfield of the Levine, Greenberg, Rostan Literary Agency

Reminder: New literary agents (with this spotlight featuring Sarah Bedingfield of the Levine, Greenberg, Rostan Literary Agency) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list. Sarah Bedingfield Featured

About Sarah: Prior to joining LGR in 2016, Sarah began her publishing career in trade fiction editorial at Crown and Hogarth. There, she worked with a range of bestselling and award-winning novels, including The Barrowfields by Phillip Lewis, Han Kang’s Human Acts and Man Booker International Prize winning debut The Vegetarian, as well as the New York Times bestselling novel The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George. Sarah hails from North Carolina, where she graduated from UNC Chapel Hill with a double major in Psychology and English. Her favorite authors include Sarah Waters, Shirley Jackson, Matthew Thomas, Maria Semple, Emily St. John Mandel, Erin Morgenstern, and Victor Hugo.

She is Seeking: Sarah is seeking most types of literary and upmarket commercial fiction, especially novels that show powerful imagination, compulsive plotting, and unique voices. Epic family dramas, cross-genre narratives with notes of magical realism, darkly Gothic stories that may lead to nightmares, and twisty psychological suspense are among her favorite things to read. A southerner at heart, she can’t help but love books set in the south, but she’s a die-hard for any world immersive enough to make her miss her stop on the train, cry in public, or desperately seek help.

How to Submit: Please send queries to sbedingfield@lgrliterary.com. Query should include a brief synopsis and bio, as well as the first fifty pages of your novel.

Screen Shot 2016-08-08 at 2.57.50 PM

The biggest literary agent database anywhere
is the Guide to Literary Agents. Pick up the
most recent updated edition online at a discount.


Freese-HeadshotIf you’re an agent looking to update your information or an author interested in contributing to the GLA blog or the next edition of the book, contact Writer’s Digest Books Managing Editor Cris Freese at cris.freese@fwmedia.com.

The post New Literary Agent Alert: Sarah Bedingfield of the Levine, Greenberg, Rostan Literary Agency appeared first on WritersDigest.com.


from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com
http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/new-literary-agent-alert-sarah-bedingfield-levine-greenberg-rostan-literary-agency

Sunday, April 23, 2017

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 24

For today’s prompt, write a faith poem. For some people, faith means religion. For others, faith means trusting in science and mathematics. Still others, think George Michael’s “Faith” just as some immediately conjure up Faith Hill. Regardless of where you put your faith (or don’t), today’s poem gives you an opportunity to express yourself.

That said, just a quick reminder: Be respectful of each other. It’s my one rule, and I have faith that y’all can handle it.

*****

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_PoemsRe-create Your Poetry!

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at a Faith Poem:

“& if i die”

there’s no guarantee
the next morning will come
but i still close my eyes
anticipating rest

*****

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He has faith.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

*****

Find more poetic posts here:

The post 2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 24 appeared first on WritersDigest.com.


from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com
http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-april-pad-challenge-day-24

9 Tips for Writers from The Outsiders Author S.E. Hinton

SE Hinton FeaturedFifty years ago, Viking Press published S.E. Hinton’s classic The Outsiders, a mainstay in schools and a worthy novel on any young adult’s bookshelf. Part of the reason the book has stood the test of time, Hinton believes, is because readers still can relate to the emotions in the book.

In flipping through our archives, I found an interview with Hinton in the 2000 edition of Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market, written by Anne Bowling. The interview covers Hinton’s writing life, and her switch from writing young adult to focusing more on children’s picture books, like The Puppy Sister and Big David, Little David.

Below, I pulled nine writing tips from Hinton’s interview that you can apply to your writing life:

Be patient with your release:

[The Outsiders] wasn’t an overnight success. It got some attention because I was so young, but the success of it built over the years. It was definitely a word-of-mouth book.

On writing for an audience:

I wasn’t thinking about the audience, which I try never to do. You start feeling them looking over your shoulder, and you start thinking you’re going to make a mistake. I’ve never thought, “Oh, kids would like this, I’ll stick this in.” I especially don’t make that mistake when I’m writing for young adults.

I have to write a story the way I see it and take the consequences. You never can completely get the audience out of your mind once you’ve been published, and after The Outsiders, I found that very difficult to deal with. But since then, I think I’ve gotten pretty good at it.

Overcoming writer’s block:

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Click to order the 2017 CWIM!

Get the right boyfriend. I was in college and I was reading good writers, but at that time, I couldn’t write. I was seeing everything that was wrong with The Outsiders; I was feeling the pressure of, “What is she going to do next?” and, “She wrote this well when she was 15, and she’s going to have a masterpiece.” And I knew I didn’t have no masterpiece.

My boyfriend, who is now my husband, was saying “I don’t care if you never get published again, but you’ve got to start writing again. Enough of this gloom and doom stuff.” He said, “Write two pages a day. Nobody’s every dropped dead of two pages.” And he’d come over to take me out, and if I hadn’t done my two pages we wouldn’t go out. So that was a great motivation for writing. And I was so careful with That Was Then, This is Now—I was thinking, “I’m not going to make the mistakes I did in The Outsiders.” I did two pages, but they were hard. I didn’t put down a word that I didn’t want, and when I had a stack about the size of a book, I sent it off.

Think of all writing as practice:

The Outsiders was the third book I had written; it was just the first one I had tried to publish. The first two ended up in drawers somewhere—I used characters from them in later books, but I certainly didn’t go back and rework them. Everybody’s got to practice.

Find your reason for writing:

One reason I wrote [The Outsiders] was I wanted to read it. I couldn’t find anything that dealt realistically with teenage life. I’ve always been a good reader, but I wasn’t ready for adult books, they didn’t interest me, and I was through with all the horse books. If you wanted to read about your peer group, there was nothing to read except “Mary Jane Goes to the Prom” or “Billy Joe Hits a Home Run”—just a lot of stuff I didn’t see any relevance in.”

The key to success:

The only way you’re going to be a writer is to read all the time and then do it.

On thinking about specific writing elements:

Don’t think about what you’re doing, just keep your story going. Years later somebody’s going to write you a letter and tell you what you wrote about. So don’t worry about that part of it.

How to write believable characters:

With your characters, you have to know their astrological signs, you have to know what they eat for breakfast, and so on. That doesn’t have to come out in the book, you just have to know it anyway in defining your character. But on the other hand, no matter how well you think you’re imagining somebody, or even basing it on somebody you know, the writer is still the filter that the character goes through, so the character is still some aspect of yourself.

On writing for the young adult market:

I think the most common trap is the idea that the writer is going to take a problem and write about it: You’re going to take divorce, date rape, or drugs, and write about it, instead of thinking you’re going to take Travis, and write about him, or Rusty James, and write his story.

I think the problems are identical to the characters. One reason The Outsiders is still selling as well as it ever has, including the year the movie came out, is the kids identify with those emotions. The names of the group change, the uniforms change, but the emotions remain the same. If you’ve got ten kids in a school, they’re going to divide up into the “in” group and the “out” group.

Screen Shot 2016-08-08 at 2.57.50 PM

The biggest literary agent database anywhere
is the Guide to Literary Agents. Pick up the
most recent updated edition online at a discount.


Freese-HeadshotIf you’re an agent looking to update your information or an author interested in contributing to the GLA blog or the next edition of the book, contact Writer’s Digest Books Managing Editor Cris Freese at cris.freese@fwmedia.com.

 

 

 

The post 9 Tips for Writers from The Outsiders Author S.E. Hinton appeared first on WritersDigest.com.


from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com
http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/9-tips-writers-outsiders-author-s-e-hinton

Saturday, April 22, 2017

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 23

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Last (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: “Last Starfighter,” “Last Unicorn,” “Last Day of Summer,” “Last Cookie in the Cookie Jar,” and so on.

*****

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_PoemsRe-create Your Poetry!

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at a Last Blank Poem:

“last one”

& i grabbed it without worrying
about whether i’d want another
because of course i’d want another
as soon as i finished eating that final
black jelly bean

*****

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). People tend to either love or hate black jelly beans, Robert falls into the former category along with his stepson Reese.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

*****

Find more poetic posts here:

The post 2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 23 appeared first on WritersDigest.com.


from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com
http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-april-pad-challenge-day-23

Weekly Round-Up: Just Keep Writing

Every week our editors publish somewhere between 10 and 15 blog posts—but it can be hard to keep up amidst the busyness of everyday life. To make sure you never miss another post, we’ve created a new weekly round-up series. Each Saturday, find the previous week’s posts all in one place.


wr_iconKeep Calm and Keep Writing

Any time you start to think about giving up on writing, stop yourself. Here are 7 Things To Do When You Want to Give Up (Instead of Giving Up).

When you do have success, don’t let it get in your way. Read How to Stop Yourself from Obsessing Over Duplicating Writing Success to learn how to keep writing and improving without unnecessary stress.

One factor behind finding writing success? You first have to Find Your Writing Voice. Learn about the importance of embracing your strengths and flaws in developing your personal voice.

History and Mystery

Interested in historical fiction but unsure of where to start your research or how much to include? Check out Taking the Mystery Out of Writing History for some helpful tips.

Get some insight into the ideas and inspiration behind Archer Mayor’s bestselling mysteries in The Corpse Stops Here.

Agents and Opportunities

This week’s new literary agent alert is for Joanna MacKenzie of the Nelson Literary Agency. She is looking for literary-leaning projects with commercial potential and epic reads that beat with a universal heart. She’s drawn to smart and timely women’s fiction, character-driven mysteries and thrillers, “child in jeopardy lit,” kick-ass mom heroines, and coming-of-age stories with confident voices and characters.

For a pitching opportunity, check out #DVpit Twitter Contest for Marginalized Voices and learn more on the event occurring next week.

Get It Together

Once you’ve finished revising and editing your manuscript, there’s another hurdle to cross before submitting: You still have to write the synopsis. Read Mastering the Dreaded Synopsis to learn how.

When it comes time to put your cover together, don’t forget overlook the importance of blurbs and testimonials. Here’s How To Get Book Blurbs/Testimonials For Your Book Cover.

Poetic Asides

We’re three weeks into our 10th Annual April PAD Challenge. Catch up on all of the prompts so far:

  • Day 15: Write a “one time” poem.
  • Day 16: Write a poem titled “(blank) System,” replacing the blank with a word or phrase of your choice.
  • Day 17: Write a “dance” poem.
  • Day 18: Two-for-Tuesday! Write a “life” poem, or write a “death” poem.
  • Day 19: Write a “memory” poem.
  • Day 20: Write a “task” poem.
  • Day 21: Write a poem using an object as the title.

The post Weekly Round-Up: Just Keep Writing appeared first on WritersDigest.com.


from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com
http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/there-are-no-rules/weekly-round-up/weekly-round-just-keep-writing

Friday, April 21, 2017

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 22

For today’s prompt, write a fable poem. A fable is a story that conveys a moral, usually told with animal characters.

*****

Recreating_Poetry_Revise_PoemsRe-create Your Poetry!

Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation process!

In the 48-minute tutorial video Re-creating Poetry: How to Revise Poems, poets will be inspired with several ways to re-create their poems with the help of seven revision filters that they can turn to again and again.

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at a Fable Poem:

“the north pole penguin”

An emperor penguin spoke with reindeer one day
& asked how they were able to pull Santa’s sleigh
to which they replied, “It’s a really simple goal:
Just leave this hemisphere to visit the North Pole.”
Because deer anywhere else are stuck to the ground,
the penguin thought their rationale sounded quite sound.
He purchased a one-way ticket to get him there
& was eaten for dinner by a polar bear.
The moral, of course, is not to venture too far
from what you know & to be happy where you are.

*****

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He loves reading fables to his children, because he loves reading fables to himself.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

*****

Find more poetic posts here:

The post 2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 22 appeared first on WritersDigest.com.


from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com
http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2017-april-pad-challenge-day-22